New Efforts Address Electric Vehicle Affordability

New Efforts Address Electric Vehicle Affordability

Through the first 5 months of 2015, according to data from Hybridcars.com, plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) sales are down in the United States by 4% from 2014. This is due, in part, to the current price of gasoline being lower than the 2014 price by $0.89 cents per gallon (per the U.S. Energy Information Administration), as well as the drop off in sales of the Chevrolet Volt in anticipation of the updated model coming out soon. In fact, if the year-over-year Volt sales are ignored, the rest of the industry is actually slightly ahead of last years pace.

The higher upfront cost of PEVs is clearly one of the major hurdles to greater electric vehicle (EV) sales, along with greater consumer awareness of their benefits in reduced fuel cost, performance, and drivability. The higher price tag precludes many prospective buyers from considering a PEV, although several models are below the current average new car transaction price of $33,363, according to Edmunds.com.

Making PEVs more affordable would bring in EV buyers from a broader audience, as data from a recent Navigant Research survey of consumers in the United States indicates that the interest in PEVs is not limited to high-income families. Of the survey respondents who reported having an income between $25,000 and $50,000 annually, 15% said that they preferred their next vehicle purchase to be a PEV, which was higher than those with income of $50,000 to $150,000 annually (9%).

Incentives and Research

California is trying to make PEVs more appealing to lower-income families in areas where air quality is a concern. New programs for people living in the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District or South Coast Air Quality Management District provided incentives of up to $9,500 on a PEV purchase depending on the individuals income level. While it wont prompt a spike in nationwide sales, a successful program could encourage other regions to similarly target getting more PEVs into lower-income households.

The European Commission is also targeting lowering the cost of PEVs through three research projects. As reported by Automotive Fleet, the 3Ccar project is focusing on reducing the cost of the electronic components, which, along with the battery pack, are the primary contributors to the additional cost of PEVs. Greater volumes of PEV sales will lead to more competition in electronics, which will lower the cost and result in more sales.

Utilities are stepping up by creating programs to make EVs cheaper to operate and to make recharging easier. On June 8, the Edison Electric Institute signed a memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that will make utilities more active participants in reducing the cost of electric transportation and to build on the DOEs goal of making EVs as affordable as a gasoline car by 2022. Greater utility involvement is critical to reducing EVs operational costs as well as providing the baseline charging infrastructure for consumer confidence that EVs can be recharged wherever drivers need to go in urban areas.

Source: Forbes

SMART GRID Bulletin September 2017


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